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fillings Archives - Smile Grand Haven, Little Smiles, and Smile Orthodontics

6 Degrees of Treatment

By | Fun Stuff, Health & Wellness

When Kevin Bacon visits Smile Grand Haven, there are 6 degrees of treatment that can occur if he is diagnosed with decay:

The earlier the decay is found, the more simple and cost effective the treatment can be.  In the coming weeks, we will share with you what to expect with each treatment option.  But in the meantime, below are the basics:

The filling is the most basic treatment to restore a tooth.  A filling removes the decay and replaces it with a hard material.  It can be small or large depending on the amount and location of the decay on the tooth.

When a filling gets too big and there is not enough healthy tooth left to hold a filling, Kevin Bacon will need a crown.  A crown (sometimes called a cap) is a hat that looks like and fits over a tooth, after the decay has been removed.

If decay has reached the root of the tooth, a root canal is performed.  A root canal removes the infected root fluid (pulp) and replaces it with a substance to stabilize the tooth.  If Mr. Bacon requires a root canal, he will also require a crown to protect that remaining surface of the tooth that is exposed after the root canal.

If tooth decay is severe and the gums are also comprised (unable to hold the tooth in place) a root canal is not an option.  The tooth must be removed.  This is an extraction.

If Mr. Bacon looses a tooth, he has options with what he’d like to do with the remaining open space in his mouth.  He may choose an implant.   An implant is a fake tooth that is attached by a post that’s screwed into your jaw bone.

Lastly, if a majority of teeth are lost to decay, removable dentures (partial or full) are an option.

And, next time Kevin Bacon stops by the Smile offices, we will be sure to let you know!

 

Could stem cell research help your cavities?

By | Health & Wellness

Dentists have devised a treatment to regenerate rotten teeth that could substantially reduce the need for fillings in the future.

The therapy works by enhancing the natural ability of teeth to repair themselves through the activation of stem cells in the soft pulp at the centre.

Normally, this mechanism is limited to repairing small cracks and holes in dentine, the solid bulk of the tooth beneath the surface enamel. Now scientists have shown that the natural process can be enhanced using an Alzheimer’s drug, allowing the tooth’s own cells to rebuild cavities extending from the surface to the root.

Prof Paul Sharpe, who led the work at King’s College London, said: “Almost everyone on the planet has tooth decay at some time – it’s a massive volume of people being treated. We’ve deliberately tried to make something really simple, really quick and really cheap.”

Read the full article from The Guardian here.